Arbitrage Monday

For those of you out there who like to play the merger arbitrage game, take a look at today’s merger announcement between OSI (OSIP) and EyeTech (EYET). OSI is paying $15 cash and 0.12275 shares for each EYET share in a deal expected to close by year-end. The current 5.6% discount on the deal represents a nearly 17% annualized return for arbitrageurs.

Big Pharma Has Tough Road Ahead

Texas Jury Finds Merck Liable in Death of Man Who Took Painkiller Vioxx, Awards Widow $253.4M

Big pharmaceutical companies like Merck (MRK) and Pfizer (PFE) are a lot riskier to own than many believe. Sure they have nice dividends and low P/E’s, but a lack of new drugs to make up for patent expirations, and extreme legal uncertainties will make it tough for these companies to grow.

Before today’s award, Merck was hoping its total Vioxx liability from the thousands of open cases would be no more than $10 billion. Well, the very first judgment against them today should raise some eyebrows.

Many people are recommending the big drug stocks for their fat yields and historically low multiples, but I have been taking the other side of the coin, and will continue to avoid these names.

Amgen Report Could Prompt Closing of Genentech Gap

The 2nd quarter earnings report from biotech giant Amgen (AMGN) issued Tuesday night was a blowout, no question about it. With much of the biotech acclaim going to Genentech (DNA) in recent years, AMGN has flown under the radar and now investors are clammering to catch up. In fact, the stock is up $10 today to $80 per share. However, even with today’s run-up does Amgen still represent relative value in the biotechnology sector?

I would have to answer “yes” to that question, even though I would wait for a dip before buying any shares. Genentech trades at 52 times 2006 earnings against just 22 times for Amgen. Not to say that these multiples should be identical, but such a discepency most likely reflects an overly optimistic view on DNA and fairly lackluster sentiment surrounding Amgen. I see no reason why Amgen should garner less than 25 times earnings given its strong drug pipeline and 15% growth rate.

BSX Hits New Low

Shares of medical device maker Boston Scientific (BSX) are hitting new lows today at $29 per share. The stock now trades at less than 14 times this year’s expected earnings, despite being the leading maker of a new class of heart devices known as drug-eluting stents. These new stents are coated with drugs that help patients heal from cardiovascular surgery and are widely becoming the de-facto standard within the industry.

As has always been the case with medical devices makers such as BSX, Guidant (GDT), St. Jude Medical (STJ), and Medtronic (MDT), competitive concerns continually drive share price fluctuations. While Boston Scientific is in the lead today, Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) has solidified the number two position and will surely be helped by its pending acquisition of Guidant. Both Medtronic and Guidant have yet to begin selling their drug-eluting stents, but they are in testing. Within a year or two, most players will have competing products on the market, cutting into Boston’s lead. Hence, BSX shares are making multi-year lows today.

The good news though, is that the number of competitors is decreasing due to consolidation in the industry. The medical device market is still growing at a double digit clip annually. Although BSX’s stent market share will likely decline in coming years, the company will remain a strong competitor and currently trades at a steep discount to the other companies in the industry. The stock’s near-term momentum is definitely down, but investors should keep a close eye on Boston Scientific, as an opportune time to buy the beaten-down shares will most likely present itself at some point in the future.

When Do You Buy Pfizer?

A one-year chart of Pfizer (PFE) looks more like a black diamond slope in Vail than a stock price graph. The stock has fallen almost 40 percent over the last 12 months. Now, at$24 per share, you hear a lot of recommendations to buy PFE. The 3.1 percent dividend yield is very attractive, combined with a 2005 p/e ratio of less than 12.

After holding off in the low 30’s and high 20’s, Pfizer shares at today’s prices don’t have too much downside if you want to try and catch a falling knife. A Celebrex withdrawal would prompt significant selling, but aside from that, most of the bad news has been priced in.

The issue really is growth. Money managers on CNBC will exclaim that Pfizer hasn’t traded at 11 or 12 times earnings in years, with historical p/e ratios ranging from 17 to 30 times over the last decade. The problem is, Pfizer was growing nicely back then, at a 15 percent annual rate. Those days appear to be over as mergers have created a company with more than $52 billion in sales. At this point, a new blockbuster drug (defined as $1 billion in annual sales) contributes less than 2 percent to Pfizer’s total sales.

As a result, sales are expected to be essentially flat. The current 2006 revenue estimate for Pfizer is less than 2 percent higher than the company’s actual 2004 sales. While 11 or 12 times eanrings may be too modest a valuation, the days of 17-30 multiples on the major drug companies are over in my opinion.

Merck Cuts 2005 Guidance (We warned you!)

Just to follow-up the piece I put out here about a month ago on embattled pharmaceutical giant Merck (MRK), here’s an update on what the company said this morning. Merck cut its 2005 earnings guidance to $2.47 per share (their range is $2.42-$2.52), citing the withdrawal of Vioxx. Consensus estimates had been for a profit of $2.57 for next year.

Last month, I suggested that 2005 estimates might prove tough to hit (analysts estimated $2.60 per share at that point). During today’s conference call, the Company failed to mention anything about setting aside reserves for Vioxx-related litigation. Merck will have to address this at some point in the new year and many believe they will have to allocate $10-$20 billion to settle claims.

The company remains adamant that it will not cut the dividend, which stands at $1.52 per share. This still seems unrealistic given the need for Merck to set aside reserves and also continue its R&D in order to replace, not only Vioxx revenue, but also Zocor when its goes off patent in 2006. Maintaining a payout ratio of 62% ($1.52/$2.47) seems like a poor use of cash flow. Once management realizes this, the dividend will be the first thing they cut.

Another Blown Analyst Call

The best performing equity group since President Bush won reelection last week has been the HMO sector. Stocks like United Health (UNH), Wellpoint (WLP), Anthem (ATH), and Aetna (AET) have been on fire. PacifiCare (PHS), a second-tier player and long-time Peridot holding, has also rallied, from a $34 close on election day to $44 as of yesterday. This morning, Banc of America Securities finally decided to cave and upgrade the stock from “sell” to “neutral.” The firm raised its price target on PHS shares from $25 (it’s 52-week low) to $44 (it’s current price). The report also pointed out, for those of us who are less than perceptive, that the “sell” rating had “not been a good call.”

As happens too often on Wall Street, we have another case of an analyst being completed wrong and having to throw in the towel and admit defeat. Why would anyone follow B of A’s advice on PacifiCare when they have been dead wrong on the stock for as long as the eye can see?

Merck’s Value Proposition Could Prove Dangerous

Analysts and fund managers are quick to point out that recently decimated shares of pharma giant Merck (MRK) present value to investors; with an unusually high dividend ($1.52 annually for a yield of more than 5%), a below-market earnings multiple, and a stock price not seen in about a decade. Merck CEO Ray Gilmartin has remained adamant that the dividend is safe and will not be cut, despite 2005 earnings per share estimates having been slashed from $3.40 to $2.60 since the withdrawal of Vioxx.

With $2.5 billion in annual Vioxx sales now gone, investors are focused on thousands of class action lawsuits which are sure to surface shortly. Settling all claims could cost the company billions of dollars. Another blockbuster drug, Zocor, which amounts to $5 billion of Merck’s $22 billion in revenue, is set to come off patent in 2006. So, in a span of less than 2 years, Merck will have lost $7.5 billion in sales, or about a third of its business, all while attempting to defeat thousands of lawsuits from patients who have taken Vioxx for years.

It appears possible that concrete evidence will surface that could prove Merck management knew of the increased heart attack risk that Vioxx presented, but chose to keep it in close confidence. Although not a probable result, it is not out of the question that this company could be in trouble if such a scenario played out. With its base business set to deteriorate, the longevity of a large dividend payout certainly comes into question. As does the “value” presented by Merck shares with a 2005 P/E of 11, when it could prove very tough to hit the reduced EPS estimates of $2.60 per share.

Investors should not assume the 5-plus percent dividend makes the stock a safe value play, even if the CEO insists it will not be cut. Shorting the shares is costly as long as the dividend remains, as those who borrow the shares will have to pay whoever bought their shares. As a result, the best way to play a further fall in Merck shares, if you are wary of the company’s future prospects, may be owning in-the-money puts.